FAQs

These FAQs are a collection of queries that have come in from users of Canvas at Hull.

You can search the FAQ database to see if your question has already been answered. Our entire list of FAQs can be seen below.

Assessment

Blind second marking

Blind second marking is the process whereby 2 (or more) markers independently undertake a full and complete set of feedback and grades without sight of the other markers work until the grades and feedback are completed. A comparison exercise is then undertaken within the team to establish the grade and feedback that are given to to the student.

In blind second marking, a significant (>5%) variation in grading would be cause for concern and would normally be brought to the attention of the External Examiner.

Blind second marking is a useful exercise for Newly Qualified Teachers (NQTs) who are in their first year in post. An established lecturer completes a full set of marks and then the NQT also completes a full set of marks unsighted of the first marker. They then compare results and discuss the variations in marking.

Canvas currently has no facility for blind second marking.

This feature request has been made by many in the Canvas community and is high on the list of requirements from UK HEIs using Canvas. This page will be updated when we have more information after the UK Canvas Conference on the 12/10/16

 

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What is second marking?

Second marking is the process whereby two (or more) markers each undertake a full and complete set of marks and feedback which are recorded against the student work.

Sighted/collaborative second marking

Second marking can be sighted/collaborative where by the marking team see each others feedback and together award an agreed grade to the student. The process is fully collaborative and the markers discuss the work and provide independent feedback.

Both/all markers provide a full set of feedback (not just “I agree with the first markers comments”).

Process in Canvas

Collaborative marking can easily be done by the first marker logging in to Canvas, accessing the assignment submission and providing feedback. Then the second marker logs in to Canvas, accesses the same assignment and overlays their feedback, comments and mark-up on top of the first markers feedback etc.

Collectively they then agree on a grade together and the grade is input in to the box. The feedback must be consistent with the grade awarded and any significant variation on opinion between markers should be resolved before the feedback is entered in to the system and surfaced to the student.

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Penalties for late submissions define what is considered as a “late submission”. Anything submitted after the given deadline is considered a late submission and how the penalties apply will affect when marking should/can start on the submissions.

The details of what penalties are applied for a late submission are below, but in summary:

“24 hours after the deadline has passed, a piece of work can only receive 40% or 10% deduction from the original mark – which ever is lower.”

The impact of this on assignment marking is the following recommendation:

Marking can begin 24+ hours after the original due date has passed

This allows sufficient time for students to submit work and obtain the appropriate penalty for submitting within 24 hours and not being penalised to the minimum mark (or lower).

 

Late submissions are defined as follows according to the Academic regulations Chapter VII. Paragraph 32.

1. The following penalties must be adhered to:

(i)    Penalties are a percentage of the maximum mark available for the assessment element which has been submitted late

(ii)   All coursework assessments must have a published submission time which should be no later than 4pm and this time must be communicated effectively to students

(iii)  Departments delivering non standard modules may apply to FLTAC (or equivalent) for exemption from (ii)

(iv) The late submission penalties which must be applied to coursework submitted after the published deadline are:

·       Up to and including 24 hours after the deadline, a penalty of 10%

·       More than 24 hours and up to and including 7 days after the deadline; either a penalty of 10% or the mark awarded is reduced to the pass mark, whichever results in the lower mark

·       More than 7 days after the deadline, a mark of zero is awarded.

Explanatory note (added May 12)

·       Para. 31: the definition of coursework does not include assessments which are scheduled, for example, examinations, presentations, performances and practicals.

·       Para. 32: Examples applying the penalties in (iv) for coursework submitted up to and including 24 hours after the deadline:

§  If the maximum mark for the assessment is 100 and a student submits the assessment 2 hours after the deadline, the student’s mark will be reduced by 10 (so that a mark of 65 will be reduced to 55, a mark of 48 will be reduced to 38 and so on).

§  If the maximum mark for the assessment is 50 and a student submits the assessment 2 hours after the deadline, the student’s mark will be reduced by 5 (so that a mark of 40 will be reduced to 35, a mark of 36 will be reduced to 31 and so on).

 

Examples applying the penalties in (iv) for coursework submitted more than 24 hours and up to and including 7 days after the deadline:

 

Where the maximum mark for the assessment is 100

Student A B C D E
Pre-penalty mark 100 50 45 40 30
10% penalty (of the maximum mark – in this case 100) 90 40 35 30 20

or

Mark awarded is reduced to the pass mark 40 40 40 40 40
 
Outcome (the lower mark) 40 40 35 30 20

§  These penalties should be taken into account when deciding submission dates.

§  Where multiple submissions (hardcopy and electronic copy) are required guidance must make clear to students whether failure to submit in only one format constitutes ‘non submission’.

 

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Firstly make sure you are familiar with the document that clarifies the University position on anonymous marking and when in the workflow it must take place. You can read up on how anonymous marking is defined in the regulations here.

Anonymous marking can be turned on either at individual assignment level or for an entire Canvas course. The TEL team recommend that where required, usually for summative assessment, anonymous marking is set up for an assignment at the time the assignment is created.

Turning on anonymous marking for an assignment replaces the student name with “student 1, student 2, student 3 etc..”

It is important to note that any instructor on the course can turn on anonymous marking or turn it off.

This permission cannot be changed at the time of writing.

 

Individual Assignment.

If the anonymity is turned on per assignment, then the assignment must first be created and published.

  1. Go to SpeedGrader>settings. (it is the cog icon on the top left of SpeedGrader)
  2. Turn on “Hide student names in the SpeedGrader” for the assignment before any students actually submit the work.

There is a Canvas guide showing you how to turn on anonymous marking for an individual assignment here.

 

Gradebook annonymity

You can also hide student names in the Gradebook. For information on how to do this please see this Canvas Guide

 

Course level anonymity

To turn on course-level anonymity, you will need to access the course features. For information on how to do this, please see this guide.

 

For more information on the interpretation of anonymous marking in the Academic Regulations please see this FAQ.

At present, Double blind marking, the process of two academics marking the work without seeing each others grades or feedback is not possible. This feature has been requested and is under consideration by Canvas.

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Feedback completed using SpeedGrader (not Grademark) in Canvas, is kept for over 7 years. This was one of the requirements of any VLE vendor when the invitation to tender was put out.

Turnitin Grademark will only guarantee the storage of originality reports and feedback for 180 days which does not comply with the QAA requirements on feedback archiving.

Switching to SpeedGrader

The lack of archiving of feedback and student submissions in Turnitin and Grademark means the TEL team are advocating that people switch to using SpeedGrader at the earliest opportunity and stop using Grademark for marking and feedback.

Feature-rich feedback

In addition to this, SpeedGrader allows for multiple markers, unlimited audio feedback, the addition of video feedback and better document mark up for feedback. All good reasons to make the switch.

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