FAQs

These FAQs are a collection of queries that have come in from users of Canvas at Hull.

You can search the FAQ database to see if your question has already been answered. Our entire list of FAQs can be seen below.

Assessment

Blind second marking

Blind second marking is the process whereby 2 (or more) markers independently undertake a full and complete set of feedback and grades without sight of the other markers work until the grades and feedback are completed. A comparison exercise is then undertaken within the team to establish the grade and feedback that are given to to the student.

In blind second marking, a significant (>5%) variation in grading would be cause for concern and would normally be brought to the attention of the External Examiner.

Blind second marking is a useful exercise for Newly Qualified Teachers (NQTs) who are in their first year in post. An established lecturer completes a full set of marks and then the NQT also completes a full set of marks unsighted of the first marker. They then compare results and discuss the variations in marking.

Canvas currently has no facility for blind second marking.

This feature request has been made by many in the Canvas community and is high on the list of requirements from UK HEIs using Canvas. This page will be updated when we have more information after the UK Canvas Conference on the 12/10/16

 

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There are two ways you can see details of your assignment submissions:

  1. While the assignment is still open, you can click on Assignments in the left hand menu and the time and date of your submission will show at the right hand side. You can print or save this screen as a receipt
  1. After the assignment has closed, you can still see the date (but not the time) it was submitted by going into your Account at the top of the left hand menu and clicking on Files and Submissions.
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What is second marking?

Second marking is the process whereby two (or more) markers each undertake a full and complete set of marks and feedback which are recorded against the student work.

Sighted/collaborative second marking

Second marking can be sighted/collaborative where by the marking team see each others feedback and together award an agreed grade to the student. The process is fully collaborative and the markers discuss the work and provide independent feedback.

Both/all markers provide a full set of feedback (not just “I agree with the first markers comments”).

Process in Canvas

Collaborative marking can easily be done by the first marker logging in to Canvas, accessing the assignment submission and providing feedback. Then the second marker logs in to Canvas, accesses the same assignment and overlays their feedback, comments and mark-up on top of the first markers feedback etc.

Collectively they then agree on a grade together and the grade is input in to the box. The feedback must be consistent with the grade awarded and any significant variation on opinion between markers should be resolved before the feedback is entered in to the system and surfaced to the student.

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Canvas Workflows: In order of preference.

  • Academics have to wait until the “available until” date has passed and the assignment is closed. This guarantees that there will be no more submissions, This will be 1 week after the due date of the assignment as per the late submission rules, unless teams wish to bring that forward?
  1. Impact of this is that marking cannot start until 1 week after the due date.
  2. Positive impact: All students have the same opportunities to submit for assessment and there is one single assessment opportunity set up
  3. Better for administrators

  • Academics start marking all submitted work 24 hours after the due date has passed. After 24 hours any work the student submits can only receive a 40% mark. The majority of students do not submit after this date.
  1. The impact of this is that students can still submit after 24 hours and thus will still need marking in a “mop up” process
  2. Canvas allows for this by filtering all submissions in SpeedGrader either chronologically or by the “marked or not” flag for easy access. It should be quite easy to see who has submitted after marking has started.

  • Academics set up assignments to close on their due date and create a separate assignment that opens on the due date but is called “late submissions” or something similar. This way marking can start on the original submissions that were in on or before the due date. All of the students who submit to the “Late assignment” can then be felt with separately. 
  1. This is the least preferable workflow as it creates duplicity.
  2. This option all is not perfect as you either have to add students to the late submission manually or risk that students who have already submitted in the original submission, submit again in the late submission opportunity in error.
  3. This has high overheads for both administrative staff and academic staff who have to create and monitor two assignments for every assessment.
  4. High risk of student submitting to the “on time assignment” AND the “Late submission”.

There is always the potential that s student submits an inferior piece of work as another submission opportunity and would be marked accordingly. However, this HAS to be the responsibility of the student. They choose what work to submit whether that is their best work or not.

We had a similar issue in eBridge that a student might submit an inferior piece of work initially and because eBridge did not allow the student to remove the work and re-submit a different piece, they had to apply to their tutor to get it changed. This could just as easily be done for a student submitting in Canvas in error after the due date or with an inferior piece of work. They would have to ask their tutor for an “extension” which Canvas easily allows for in the assignment.

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Interpreting the Turnitin Originality Report for Staff

Assignments submitted to Turnitin through the Assignments Tool in Canvas will produce an Originality Report. The report highlights matches with other documents scanned by Turnitin and it will also show the source for that match. Viewing the report will help: detect plagiarism; identify the evidence to support an unfair means claim and to understand some of the student’s approach and failings with regard to academic practice. (Links to an external site.)

Detecting Plagiarism

Turnitin does not identify plagiarism, it simply matches text. The report doesn’t separate correctly cited work from attempts to cheat. The report will also show common phrases such as ‘on the one hand’. Turnitin will also fail to identify where text has been paraphrased from another source without reference. The University Regulations on the Use of Unfair Means identify The primary test of plagiarism as follows ‘This is the presence or absence of quotation marks, and adequate acknowledgement of sources and authorities in text and/or reference notes in bibliographies or lists of sources.’

After students submit work to Turnitin via Canvas, the Originality Report is generated and a report icon will be visible in the Turnitin column. The colour of this icon will vary depending on the similarity score given by Turnitin. If it is red, then the similarity against other documents is 75-100%, orange 50-75%, yellow 25-50%, green 1-25% and blue no matching text.

The percentages themselves should not be taken as the only measure of plagiarism as there are a number of reasons why 25% may in fact have less plagiarism than a piece of work reporting 12%, for example. A high percentage may indicate poor academic practice, overuse of quotations or plagiarism. Where the score is nearer to 100% this is likely to be erroneous resubmission of a previous piece of work or completely copied or purchased work.

For useful ways to identify plagiarism in work view Anti-Plagiarism Strategies for Research Papers (Links to an external site.) (Harris, 2012).

Understanding the Report

Moving your mouse pointer over the report icon causes a pop-up to show the exact similarity figure. When the icon is clicked the Turnitin Originality Report will open.

You can download or print a PDF version of the report. This contains the same information but loses the interactivity of the web interface. Click either of the two icons  at the top of the screen.

There are three areas in the Originality Report screen. The document viewer frame shows the Similarity Index for the work and the Title and Author of the work. The left-hand panel displays the paper text and the right-hand panel displays the matching sources of text.

The example report below shows that 55% of the work has been matched to other sources. The red section shows that 22% of the essay can be found athttp://dictionary.reference.com (Links to an external site.)

Checking Matched Text

Where Turnitin has found matches it will report them in different ways. Websites, books and journals
will be identified. Student papers within the repository will identify the institution to which the work was submitted. You will not be able to view the work without contacting the institution to ask them for permission.
Where plagiarism is suspected you may need to request a copy of the work from another institution. This can be done by clicking on the matching text in the left panel. A popup will show the text and ‘Submitted to . Clicking on the name of the institution will open a screen allowing you to request the work. Turnitin will then send an email to the instructor responsible for the class to which the work was submitted asking them to email the work to you.

It can be helpful to filter the details in the report to lower the number of matches. Bibliographies, quotations and word groupings can be excluded using the links above the document text panel. Quotations in ‘single quotes’
rather than “double quote” will still be highlighted if the option to exclude quotations is selected.

It is worth noting that Turnitin will not be able to check all possible sources. Turnitin keeps secret the exact sources they do check against, but mention 20 billion web pages, 220 million student papers at 10 thousand educational institutions and 90 thousand other publications. On occasion Turnitin will identify an incorrect source. This can occur because the text appears in more than one place e.g. multiple websites.

Where matching text has been identified you should consider whether the text represents an attempt to present the work of others as their own or simply poor academic writing. Using the Originality Report can help identify issues with the student work and give feedback and directions to support.

A large number of generic resources to support students with academic writing are available on the Skills Team web pages at http://libguides.hull.ac.uk/skills.

Other Questions

What file formats will Turnitin accept?
Most common word-processing formats are accepted. Turnitin will accept documents in Microsoft Word, WordPerfect, PostScript, PDF, HTML, RTF, and plain text. Microsoft PowerPoint, Excel documents and formats for computer programming languages are not accepted.

What is the maximum file size that Turnitin accepts?
The maximum file size is approximately 20MB.

References

Harris, J (2012).
Anti-Plagiarism Strategies for Research Papers. [online] Available at: http://www.virtualsalt.com/antiplag.htm (Links to an external site.) [Accessed 29 August 2012]

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Penalties for late submissions define what is considered as a “late submission”. Anything submitted after the given deadline is considered a late submission and how the penalties apply will affect when marking should/can start on the submissions.

The details of what penalties are applied for a late submission are below, but in summary:

“24 hours after the deadline has passed, a piece of work can only receive 40% or 10% deduction from the original mark – which ever is lower.”

The impact of this on assignment marking is the following recommendation:

Marking can begin 24+ hours after the original due date has passed

This allows sufficient time for students to submit work and obtain the appropriate penalty for submitting within 24 hours and not being penalised to the minimum mark (or lower).

 

Late submissions are defined as follows according to the Academic regulations Chapter VII. Paragraph 32.

1. The following penalties must be adhered to:

(i)    Penalties are a percentage of the maximum mark available for the assessment element which has been submitted late

(ii)   All coursework assessments must have a published submission time which should be no later than 4pm and this time must be communicated effectively to students

(iii)  Departments delivering non standard modules may apply to FLTAC (or equivalent) for exemption from (ii)

(iv) The late submission penalties which must be applied to coursework submitted after the published deadline are:

·       Up to and including 24 hours after the deadline, a penalty of 10%

·       More than 24 hours and up to and including 7 days after the deadline; either a penalty of 10% or the mark awarded is reduced to the pass mark, whichever results in the lower mark

·       More than 7 days after the deadline, a mark of zero is awarded.

Explanatory note (added May 12)

·       Para. 31: the definition of coursework does not include assessments which are scheduled, for example, examinations, presentations, performances and practicals.

·       Para. 32: Examples applying the penalties in (iv) for coursework submitted up to and including 24 hours after the deadline:

§  If the maximum mark for the assessment is 100 and a student submits the assessment 2 hours after the deadline, the student’s mark will be reduced by 10 (so that a mark of 65 will be reduced to 55, a mark of 48 will be reduced to 38 and so on).

§  If the maximum mark for the assessment is 50 and a student submits the assessment 2 hours after the deadline, the student’s mark will be reduced by 5 (so that a mark of 40 will be reduced to 35, a mark of 36 will be reduced to 31 and so on).

 

Examples applying the penalties in (iv) for coursework submitted more than 24 hours and up to and including 7 days after the deadline:

 

Where the maximum mark for the assessment is 100

Student A B C D E
Pre-penalty mark 100 50 45 40 30
10% penalty (of the maximum mark – in this case 100) 90 40 35 30 20

or

Mark awarded is reduced to the pass mark 40 40 40 40 40
 
Outcome (the lower mark) 40 40 35 30 20

§  These penalties should be taken into account when deciding submission dates.

§  Where multiple submissions (hardcopy and electronic copy) are required guidance must make clear to students whether failure to submit in only one format constitutes ‘non submission’.

 

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Firstly make sure you are familiar with the document that clarifies the University position on anonymous marking and when in the workflow it must take place. You can read up on how anonymous marking is defined in the regulations here.

Anonymous marking can be turned on either at individual assignment level or for an entire Canvas course. The TEL team recommend that where required, usually for summative assessment, anonymous marking is set up for an assignment at the time the assignment is created.

Turning on anonymous marking for an assignment replaces the student name with “student 1, student 2, student 3 etc..”

It is important to note that any instructor on the course can turn on anonymous marking or turn it off.

This permission cannot be changed at the time of writing.

 

Individual Assignment.

If the anonymity is turned on per assignment, then the assignment must first be created and published.

  1. Go to SpeedGrader>settings. (it is the cog icon on the top left of SpeedGrader)
  2. Turn on “Hide student names in the SpeedGrader” for the assignment before any students actually submit the work.

There is a Canvas guide showing you how to turn on anonymous marking for an individual assignment here.

 

Gradebook annonymity

You can also hide student names in the Gradebook. For information on how to do this please see this Canvas Guide

 

Course level anonymity

To turn on course-level anonymity, you will need to access the course features. For information on how to do this, please see this guide.

 

For more information on the interpretation of anonymous marking in the Academic Regulations please see this FAQ.

At present, Double blind marking, the process of two academics marking the work without seeing each others grades or feedback is not possible. This feature has been requested and is under consideration by Canvas.

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The university academic regulations state the following in relation to anonymous marking;

All forms of summative1 assessment must be marked2 anonymously where this is practicable3. Where it is considered that anonymity is not practicable it should be declared in the module specification and approved as part of the usual module approval process.

The regulation is Chapter III. paragraph 23.

For use in Canvas, there are several key points to make this clearer for application:

  1. Anonymous marking must be applied to summative work where practical (i.e. not for performances etc)
    • It is the marking of the work that must be done anonymously
    • This may include the subsequent moderation of marks
    • This may include curving marks for boards
    • This may include discussion of marks at board
  2. Where this is practicable
    • SpeedGrader can be used to make the marking process anonymous
    • Currently, the Moderation tool does not allow for anonymous marking

Anonymous marking is subject to review in 2016/17 as part of a LEAP review of Assessment regulations.

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Feedback completed using SpeedGrader (not Grademark) in Canvas, is kept for over 7 years. This was one of the requirements of any VLE vendor when the invitation to tender was put out.

Turnitin Grademark will only guarantee the storage of originality reports and feedback for 180 days which does not comply with the QAA requirements on feedback archiving.

Switching to SpeedGrader

The lack of archiving of feedback and student submissions in Turnitin and Grademark means the TEL team are advocating that people switch to using SpeedGrader at the earliest opportunity and stop using Grademark for marking and feedback.

Feature-rich feedback

In addition to this, SpeedGrader allows for multiple markers, unlimited audio feedback, the addition of video feedback and better document mark up for feedback. All good reasons to make the switch.

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Open Grades

Open Grades

In Course Navigation, click the Grades link.

 

View Assignment Details

View Assignment Details

Click the title of an assignment.

 

To download a PDF of the submission and annotations, click the Download icon.

Once the file has downloaded, Open downloaded file in Adobe Reader. (If you need to install Adobe Reader, you can get it here: www.get.adobe.com/uk/reader (Links to an external site.)

Select File then Print from the menu

Click Summarize Comments


Click Yes

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Information for Students.

Canvas uses SpeedGrader to deliver feedback, comments, grades to you quickly, efficiently and effectively; and is the Universities recommended approach to marking and feedback.

Prior to Canvas and SpeedGrader, some staff were using a marking tool that came with Turnitin originality checking software called GradeMark. This short video takes you through the process of accessing Turnitin via Canvas and into Grademark to receive your feedback from staff still using this tool.

For more details on how to access your assignments you can read this Canvas Guide (Links to an external site.) for students.

If you have additional queries regarding understanding your feedback when completed in GradeMark, you can read the Turnitin guidance documents here (Links to an external site.).

 

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Viewing your assignment feedback

canvas logo.JPG

How do I view assignment feedback comments from my instructor using Canvas DocViewer annotations?

Viewing feedback online

On the assignment submission details page, some of your graded assignments may appear as file upload attachments that include a View Feedback button. Instead of leaving comments directly on the assignment, your instructor may choose to include comments directly in the assignment using annotations, or inline comments. These comments are made using Canvas DocViewer, (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. which you can also use to reply to any comments or make your own annotations.

Some browsers may not initially render comments correctly when viewing feedback. If your browser includes a built-in PDF viewer, select the option to view the PDF in the system viewer. You can also download PDF files with comments to view on your computer. The settings required to view or print the annotations in the PDF vary based on the software installed on your computer.

Notes:

  • If the assignment attachment displays a Preview button instead of the View Feedback button, your file is not DocViewer compatible and will not include any annotated comments.
  • If the browser window is too small, the View Feedback button may not be visible. Make sure your browser window is fully maximized when viewing feedback. Alternatively, you may need to scroll within the Submission Details box to see the View Feedback button.

Open Grades

Open Grades

In Course Navigation, click the Grades link.

View Assignment Details

View Assignment Details
Click the title of an assignment.

View Feedback

View Feedback

Click the View Feedback button.

Note: If the assignment attachment displays a Preview button, your file is not DocViewer compatible.

View Annotated Comments

View Annotated Comments

View the annotated comments from your instructor [1]. To reply to a comment, hover over the comment and click the Reply button [2]. You can also use DocViewer (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. to make your own annotations on your assignment.

Download File

Download File

To download a PDF of the submission and annotations, click the Download icon.

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Extensions to a coursework deadline can be granted by an academic or administrator for reasons that are not covered under an Application for Mitigating Circumstances.

Mitigation

“Mitigation is circumstances that have occurred in your life that could have had a significant impact on your ability to sit exams, submit coursework, make a presentation etc. and have generally affected your academic performance.”

Basic guide to mitigation for students

Details of mitigation vary slightly between programmes and therefore need to be looked at by programme. Full details can be found relating to the relevant programme here.

Extensions

“This [extension application] form must be used by students who wish to request in advance an extension to the approved deadline for the submission of coursework, in cases where they have experienced acute circumstances affecting the submission of specific work. Do NOT use this form to claim general mitigating circumstances, or to explain absence from an examination.”

Extensions are designed to cover issues that are not a “significant” impact on the student’s studies. I.E. a 1 day extension awarded to a student who had not been able to submit on submission day due to circumstances beyond their control (but not an IT issue!)

Extensions must be made in advance of the deadline.

Extensions are easily granted in Canvas using the “Add +” button at the bottom of an assignment under “Available from/until” dates.

Frequently Asked Questions

Will the students see the extensions given to other students?
No, only the student with the extension sees the altered date. Everyone else sees the original date only.

Will a student with an extension be highlighted as ‘late’ if they submit beyond their extension due date?
Yes. The same rules apply to all students. It is the date that determines their “late” submission flag. So a student with an extension of two days will be marked as late submitting if they fail to submit before the extended deadline.

What about assignments using Turnitin?
This works in exactly the same way for students submitting through Canvas to Turnitin. They will also be able to and receive reports from Turnitin with an altered submission date.

 

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Yes.

Anonymity in speedgrader still needs setting.

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TurnItIn

Yes.

Anonymity in speedgrader still needs setting.

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